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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
this was not political, it was not for this, this, and this reason, it was in fact trying to make sure the mesh economy was on solid base and that we could get some jobs back. >> we're about four minutes from the beginning of that q&a session. we are monitoring mr. bernanke's address, art. we'll bring you the session when it does begin. >>> bond traders also keeping a very close eye on mr. bernanke and his remarks and the upcoming q&a that we'll bring you. rick santelli tracking the action at the cme. reactions? >> i've been phoning around. there is a very common thread especially among a lot of the futures traders. they keyed if on one sentence of ben bernanke. we'll show it on the screen. we expect that a highly accommodative stance of monetary policy remain appropriate for a considerable time after the economy strengthens. and this is what traders were not happy about. i talked to two or three traders that said they're going to be moving now almost exclusively in trading non-financials, commodities, precious metals, and his opinion -- things that the fed can't print. they also think that ultimately
's a point you made earlier in an earlier segment that the bottom line is the economy is still very, very weak. i'll tell you, we've been on overweight equities for the last six or nine months. we're now starting to pull back some of the risk. yes, the market could rally higher. i don't see the stimulus up as much as i did when everybody didn't believe qe-3 was coming. i think there's more negative potential headlines. we're taking risk off the table right now and hopefully we'll re-enter at a lower position. >> it's interesting. rickntelli, the fiscal cliff keeps coming up. that's one of the biggest issues in terms of keeping businesses from making any real decisions here, putting money to work, and it's also the highlight going into the election. >> it is. i guess the real irony is even if the fiscal cliff didn't exist, the outlook economically, both domestically and globally, is deteriorating. really, it's a bit of a double whammy. i'll go back to what i said the last time we discussed this an hour ago. if you look at the 21 weeks from mid-october to march of 2000 when the nasdaq crash
the rest of the economy has started to feel the effect from the sluggish manufacturing sector. if you look at the breakdown of the services pmi, the construction services sub index -- meanwhile, new orders were dragged lower by demand weakness for transportation. over in australia, a survey showed an even grimmer picture as its services index dipped to 41.9 in september. india reports its all important services pmi tomorrow, while hsbc is out next monday. that's all from me. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up on today's show, we head to paris to find out more, the attempts to offload his unit. then to hong kong where we examine the political transition in china plagued by scandals and disappearances. we get an expert view on the new leadership change. >>> and next, washington and its debate tonight as romney and obama finally square off. we'll have a preview of what to expect and what's at stake with our very own democrat-republican panel. >>> and real estate is on the rise. we head to new york with founder barbara corcoran. mariano rajoy has denied reports that spain will request a bai
output at a plant as the economy slows and demand weakens. meantime 40% of china's iron ore mines are standing idle as steel prices have crumbled. and loans to firms and households fell more than expected. ecb staying loans to the private sector fell 0.6% from the same month a year ago. italy's borrowing costs falling at a bond auction today. analysts say the auction shows nand for italian government paper remains healthy. and eu regulators are prepare to go charge microsoft for failing to comply with a 2009 ruling. that ruling had on ordered the company to offer user as choice of web browsers. apparently they may not have done that. if guilty, microsoft could face fines of up to 10% of its global revenues. and that would be a lot of money. >> iran still, we're this close to nuclear -- think our unfunded labels are like 60 trillion or something. europe back in the crapper, but the refs. huh? >> i told you, i don't always like unions. i'm actually happy that the refs union won. >> it does provide a release from some of the travails and the worries of every day life. spoorts is spor
. the economy is obviously a big part of this story. the qe announcement providing a shock to stock. we'll talk to charlie evans at 8:30 eastern time. and then it is your money, your vote. we'll start the countdown to the first presidential tee batd, that is on wednesday night. we'll be turning to a pair of political strategists in the next half hour for a preview. plus a cnbc exclusive, julia boars sten catching up with sheryl sandberg. including just how many people put everything about themselves online. >> does it scare that you you've helped create a generation of oversharers? >> i think what we give is people the ability to share what they want. what is one person's ridiculous oversharing is another person's regular day and we build technology that lets users share what they want to share and that's tremendously exciting. >> julia will join us with more of that conversation coming up at 7:30. and we'll find out why craig barrett is not a facebook fan. and in sports news, yes, europe has retained the ryder cup. staging a comeback after the u.s. began sunday with a big lead. europe has won
while consumer prices slipped further in august raising fears the world's third biggest economy could yet fall into recession by year end. >>> what a big day. >> super friday. >> we have the french budget proposal, the results of the spain audit/stress test, we've got, what else -- it's the end of the quarter. britain is announcing it libor reforms. >> that's not what i was talking about. it's the ryder cup, folks. forget all that stuff. >> by the way, i had to google the ryder cup. >> far more important event. >> we'll talk about that later in the program. >> i don't know who insisted on that, but apparently we are going to cover it. >> before we get to that, the government of hollande is about to present it first budget. its expected to whicheverdelives of tax hikes. meantime european policymakers are appraising spain's reform plan. but today the government must brace for the results of the banking stress tests that will determine the recapitalization needs of the country's most troubled lenders. we have steve sedgwick following the story in thmadrid, but firs out to stefane i
for iran and the economy and perhaps take a military course. melissa: yeah, it feels like we're not having impact. that's why we're talking about all these things tonight. thank you very much ambassador, for coming on. >> thank you very much. melissa: hoards of demonstrators violently taking to the streets of greece and spain to protest new austerity measures. governments are trying to take one step forward to solve the continent's debt crisis but some citizens seemed determine to take two steps back. with the u.s. trying to solve its own looming debt crisis could we see this kind of turmoil break out here? steve moore from "the wall street journal" joins me with more on this. we watch these protests going on in the streets and the first thing on my mind is that it seems like things are getting worse instead of better across europe and i thought that we had sort of solved, at least part of the financial crisis there but, you know, we're looking at these pictures. what do you think, steve? >> i will answer your question whether this kind of thing could happen here, melissa because i think t
on domestic issues including the economy and jobs. the second debate on the campus of hofstra university. politico has this piece about jim leher. for the first time in the 2012 campaign, the president and mitt romney will face each other in what many consider the most important even between now and november 6. for the 12th time in the history of debates, jim leher has been asked to serve as moderator making him the most experienced a moderator and the modern history, he is uniquely suited according to his contemporary. at a time when the electorate is as divided as ever and wind -- media scrutiny is -- next is hayley. welcome to the program. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i am one of the people who spend every summer for the last few summers going around the nation asking questions. my main question is, what do people think politically and what they are paying attention to. you say are a third party is relevant, yes, they are. they will never get any kind of support as long as the american people are more interested in things like "dancing with the stars." that is a
work. but this is not one of those times. when the federal reserve talks about getting the economy moving by any means necessary it is really talking about getting more data like today's terrific ism number. given that the europeans and chinese are doing the same thing, if you're betting against the market you're fighting major central banks around the world that are doing their best to generate good data and sometimes their best is good enough. why does this overused cliche matter so much? ben bernanke said he's going to continue to buy bonds to keep interest rates down, so that this purchasing manager's number won't be an aberration. when you examine the fundamental of individual stocks, you are playing what's known as the micro. when you take into account the big data numbers like the purchasing manager's index, you're making a macro analysis. again though like the idea of fighting the fed this micro/macro dichotomy might mean nothing to you unless you took ec 101. let's put it in terms that everybody can understand. anyone who's been to a museum or taken an art class knows that
are great. that's one of the reasons the economy hasn't been strong to this point in the cycle. housing is keeping us from really stuttering on growth. we need more in housing, all that free cash flow in the corporate sector to be put to more productive use, investing in capital and labor. there's a real need for it, carl, because the capital stock in the economy is basically depreciating. we're operating with old depleted capital. >> housing is a much smaller portion. the context of this is we need a much bigger engine for this economy this time around. >> we do. but partly most of the housing is so low because it came from a high level and then a collapse. if you look at the fed flow of funds data, you've had two record quarters of growth because of higher home prices. but we need more jobs. so housing is helping, the consumer is still holding in. we need more jobs. it's got to come from the business side. >> what gives you the confidence that europe has stabilized? of course, we look at this durable goods number, we know that's partially because of european weakness, but some would s
a red flag for the economy. we'll talk more about the transports and what they're telling us at 6:40. we'll also focus on the economy with the man who is charged with officially calling recessions and the end of those recessions. james poterba will be here at 7:30. and our corporate story of the morning, smartphones and mobile devices. apple launches the new iphone 5 in 22 more countries today and this comes after blackberry posted better than expected quarterly results after the bell last night. still, it is an uphill climb for this company. we'll be talking to research in motion ceo. and plus we will welcome today's political news maker, senator rand paul, one of the nation's best known tea party members. and by the way, in case you went to sleep early last night, the official nfl refs were back on the field. get this, they got a standing ovation as they took the field. the ravens beating the browns 23-16. we will have more on the game and on what's happening in sports at 6:20 eastern time. first andrew has the morning's top business headlines. >>> on the global markets agenda, results
're finding things to do on the consumer side. i would tell you, i do think the chinese economy in particular, the export economy, is structurally broken. i think that's a big change. i've been going to china since 1995. i think there's a fundamental shift in what's going on. we saw that in the caterpillar numbers. you saw that in the federal express numbers. some people think that's cyclical. i think there's prob a m secular component to it. >> this is a very important point you're making because china's growth has been driven by the export economy. you're saying that it's in trouble, it's broken. >> i'm not saying it's broken. i'm saying there's a transition going on towards consumption exporting to europe and real estate are no longer going to be their drivers nap will probably create more volatility than we've had in the past. >> how easy is it to expect this transition? you're buying in the consumer space. >> yes, and you have the transition of the government. one of the other big messages we picked up over there, particularly in i understondia, emerging market central banks, they're ver
the world in a slowing global economy are going to open up. we'll see where it all plays out, whether all current cities are suddenly represented in oil and gold, suddenly gold and oil are so high that any gains that you get in your market averages are -- >> and yet crude oil back at -- >> 92, yeah. expressed in either euros or dollar, it's expensive. the ten year note which we know is just able to trade wherever it wants and not being influenced at all by the fed, just at a 1.63%. look at the dollar which has been around 1.28 versus the euro. 1.29 today. and then gold was at a session high, i think it was at a euro all-time high yesterday. down a little bit today. >> right now time for the global markets report. ross westgate is standing by. while you -- >> two days now? >> guess who we get onset with us. >> mr. poulter. that's fantastic. and is that the first interview he's done outside of the event? >> he may have just talked after the event, i guess, and i know he had a few guinnesss after the event. i saw a few pictures yesterday. but he had those same eyes. eyes scare me a little bi
under some of the strongest sanctions today. oil exports have been correct. the iranian economy has been hit hard. it does have an effect on the economy. we must face the truth. sanctions have not stopped iran's nuclear program. according to the international atomic energy agency, during the last year alone, iran has doubled the number of energy uses in its underground nuclear facility. at this late hour, there is only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomic bombs, and that is by placing a clear nucleare on iran's weapons program. [applause] red lines do not lead to war. they prevent war. look at nato's charter. it made clear that an attack on one member country would be considered an attack on all. new's redlined helps keep the peace in europe for nearly half a century -- red lines have helped keep the peace in europe for nearly half a century. and help preserve the peace for decades. it is the failure to place red lines that has often invited aggression. if it were drawn in the 1930 baltimore, world war ii might the been avoided -- 1930's, world war ii might have been av
of terrorism. while some romney advisers argue they should keep their focus on the economy, politico says plans are in the works for mitt romney to deliver a major foreign policy speech shortly after wednesday's debate. what do you think of that? you think he should do that? >> yes. i think, as i said, right after the killing, that wasn't the time to talk about this. >> right. >> now is the time, several weeks later, to talk about it. john heilemann, the lead in "the new york times," mistake in faith and security seen at libya mission before benghazi raid. response to the june bomb raised confidence in local guards. this benghazi story is an absolute mess. i think -- i've heard stuart stevens as saying let's focus on the economy. i think stuart stevens is exactly right. americans don't care as much in the polls about foreign policy. but several weeks later after this, i think it's very legitimate now that the press is going in and a couple of weeks have passed since the ambassador's death, now, yes. i mean, he's got a responsibility to talk about how badly the white house bungled this. >> i thi
. >> one market that they're particularly excited about is saudi arabia, the region's largest economy. we keep talking about the risks that come from swings in oil prices at least for the audi economy. and stability in the country. he says that's not really the biggest risk. at least not from a brush capital perspective. >> for the start, we have a business in the country, a large group of investors and they're focused in development. the issues are not about whether or not the economic opportunities are there. i think they are. i think saudi arabia and in terms of individual sectors, they'll perform extremely well. it's about the politics, not the economy. i think the people generally speaking are quite happy with the stimulus package and with the political system. >> tensions indeed remain high especially in some towns in the eastern province of the kingdom. of course we also got a start on the broader concept and developments in the arab spring. why he chose india over china when it comes to their broader investment strategy. and of course we'll talk about the art of private equity, as
't push the economy but can push foreign affairs. different story from our commander in afghanistan and the guy who runs afghanistan as well despite what the president said about al-qaida, they have bad news. >> al-qaida has come back and a resilient organization. they are not here in large numbers . they don't have to be anymore in large numbers. >> the reason for nato invasion was terrorism . terrorism has not gone away. it has increased. >> steve: that is not helpful for the president and his men. look what he's doing with foreign policy. >> gretchen: yesterday. paul ryan from wisconsin was asked about president obama's foreign policy and this is what he had to say. >> they are sponse was slow and confused and inconsistent and part of a bigger picture of the fact that the obama foreign policy is unraveling before our eyes . >> steve: what is happening right now in the middle east is the ugly fruits of the bum pumforeign policy. 20,000 killed and iran on the brink of having a atom bomb and russia thumb their nose . >> eric: the interview last night with karzai. terrorist attacks h
even lose our country. >> ross perot, interviewed by "usa today"'s richard wol on the economy, the deficit and debt and how it's changed since he ran for president in 1992 and '96. find richard wolffe's article in today's edition of "usa today" and at usa today.com. raz perot tonight -- ross perot tonight on c-span at 9 eastern. >>> next, a look at the presidential campaign with libertarian party candidate gary johnson. the former republican governor of new mexico talks about his view of the two-party system and obstacles for third-party candidates. from "washington journal," this is 40 minutes. >> host: joining us now is gary johnson, the former governor of new mexico, a republican 1995-2003 who is now the libertarian presidential nominee, and gary johnson, first question. when you look at the major party candidates and this year's cycle, what's missing in the debate and the dialogue? and what do you wring to the table -- what do you bring to the table? >> guest: well, how about truth for starters. the notion that both obama and romney are arguing over who's going to spend mo
the it should go down game. >> what if you're making a call on the real economy, x market. what would you be saying about the u.s. fortunes into q4? >> i still await a negative retail story that i don't have. china -- can china remain bad forever? that's a difficult question to see how long it can remain bad. >> good point. stuff on housing is good. the lead story in "the journal" today, trade slowing. slowing pmis in japan, china, europe -- >> how is this news? what news was there in that story about trade is slow? were they really that devoid of anything new? that's like, d.a. probes rackets. come on! >> meanwhile, busy week for new companies. one of the busiest weeks for ipos since july. and i think september, i just saw these numbers, the best september since '99. eight deals, $5.5 billion, best actual month since may. >> david bust ser coming back. my daughter was able to beat -- there's a claw that comes down -- my daughter got five straight. i'm glad dave & buster is coming back. >> anything worth anything? >> not more than two cents. >> and it costs 50 cents to play? >> i've dropp
financial and they're coming out with their numbers, basically the economy is improving. fewer borrowers are defaulting on their loans, on the debt. seeing more transactions, confidence has been improving for americans so they have been using their cards a little more. and paying it off. that is the environment we are in. nolast but not least, may deal with paypal, so that will add to their future transactions. for today a great day. ashley: ashley:.i. talking to john mccain about the biggest headwind facing the usa today. liz: can you imagine voting for this interview. wait until you listen come back here what he had to say. not just how we get rid of tax abductions, but all of them except two. but also which industries are mature enough that we should rip the rug out from underneath them and stop giving him all kinds of tax breaks. speaking very candidly with me. i first asked about different kinds of government strategies where government works best with this, here' here is what senator mccain had to say. >> you're picking winners and losers, and obvious in the case of solyndra and ma
nation is more than $16 trillion in the red. that is a massive bubble that threatens our entire economy. how do the candidates handle this tomorrow night? let's ask chris stirewalt our fox news digital politics editor and host of power play on foxnews.com live, and stewart varney is the host of varney & company on the fox business network. thank you so much for being here. chris i want to start with you. what can either candidate say to grab, you know, america by the lapel and make them understand what each one of them wants to do to change our financial dire straits? >> it's a heck after lot easier for mitt romney on this one since he is the outsider and hasn't been in office and wasn't part of make thag debt and president obama has over seen in fact the unprecedented increase in size of the federal debt, and as a matter of fact in talking to senior people from romney land that is exactly what mitt romney means to do when he gets on that debate stage in denver, is go off the president not just on what romney says are ineffectual policies like the president's healthcare law and stimulus
to be the worst month of the year historically. we know the global economy is weakening. everybody came on our air saying hey. short the global economy. this did not turn out to be such a good theory did it? right now, 2.9% for one of the best months of the year. not the best month but among the better months of the year. what were the two biggest gains we had this month? the two biggest days? september 6th? that was the day draghi announced the bond buying program. biggest gain. second biggest gain september 13th the day of the fomc meeting. what does this tell us? it tells us what matters in the world is central bank intervention and also what's going on in europe. what was the worst day this year? it was tuesday, the day we saw the riots in madrid because that's the day everybody said uh-oh. this whole deal with spain and this careful choreography moving toward help from the eu could fall apart. turns out maybe it's holding together a little better than anticipated. my point is what moves the world is central bank intervention and what's going on in europe. to play against that is very, very da
had expected. that suggests the economy may not be so hot, right? >> set the stage. we just downgrade the second quarter. we went from 1.7 to 1.3. we talked about that yesterday. >> this i consistent with that. >> exactly. we thought third quarter might have a two handle on it. we're taking that two handle off. before i came on goldman sachs has a report saying they're looking at 1.9. i see some over 1.8, 1.7. slow mediocre growth continues. i think the key being, can we resolve the issues that have hung over the american economy from spain? >> is madrid more important than chicago? >> at least it is today. we wanted to see what the needs would be for the spanish banks. the numbers that they put out today after this exhaustive examination. >> do you breath numbers? >> the market believes them now. they came about in line with expectations. the number could change depending on what happens with the spanish economy and if real estate prices fall even further. you think more of this like a tradeoff. if the capital requirements had been even bigger it would have meant they were going to c
us his assessment of the global economy. faber will have a live interview. >>> plus, inside the metropcs deal. was it the right call? and lifelock's first debut. the ceo is all on tap. >> announcer: today, fourth quarter investment strategies. quarter investment strategies. henry mo, not a migraine now. try this... bayer? this isn't just a headache. trust me, this is new bayer migraine. [ male announcer ] it's the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. like in a special ops mission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal collateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeting stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. trade architect. td ameritrade's empowering web-based trading platform. trade commission-free for 60 days, and we'll throw in up to $600 when you open an account. >>> all right. welcome back to "squawk on the street." the opening bell is set to ring in a minute's time. big day sha
one of the fastest growing economies since south america. also one of the hottest economies in the world. for the last year and a half the country has been run by sebastian panera. he made his fortune bringing credit cards to chile in the late 1970 wrz, richard quest joining us from london. tell us about this. pretty impressive resume for panera. >> not only impressive, but, of course, made international status, hero status, when he led his country's search and rescue off the famous chilean miners last we're. tv the sight of the president constantly always being there with the families that actually moved so much of the world now it's starting to criticize the united states. specifically, quantitative easing. that's the printing of money by the federal reserve. in an exclusive interview you with me the president said that simply printing money in america will not do the trick of rescuing the u.s. economy. >> yes. can you bring money and maybe you can solve the short-term problems. you will never solve the american problem just by printing money. you need to do much more than
in the market don't seem to reflect the declines in the economy. there's sort of a disconnect. i think you agree with that, don't you? >> i absolutely agree with you, bill. i think all of september the market has been moved, not by what's going on here in the united states, but what's been going on in europe, which says to me two things. one, any bad news out of europe is going to send the market down. two, eventually people are going to have to pay attention to what's going on in the united states. i'm expecting we're heading into earnings season, i'm expecting anemic growth, and eventually that's going to have to play into the situation here. i mean, i know you don't fight the fed, but eventually we have to come back to what's going on in terms of fundamentals and stop focusing on monetary policy. >> what do you think? are we going to focus on fundamentals? if you are, kurt, would you be a seller of this market? >> we are focused in on fundamentals. i think this has been a tug of war between the reflationists and some of the risk that's been perceived in the market. we're not investing in gdp.
program are damaging the economy. now to the presidential race here in the u.s. and both mitt romney and barack obama are busy swatting up and rehearsing for the first television debate this wednesday. polls show the republican candidate is trailing president obama in the crucial swing states. one of them is of course ohio where early voting gets under way tomorrow. from there our north america editor reports. >> ♪ the boys are back in town ♪ >> the boys are indeed back in town yet again. they call this the buckeye state for the men who are fighting for the white house it's a state to suck up to, whether it's buying the local produce. >> i'm thinking we are going to be eating some corn over the weekend. >> or urging minors to phone a friend. >> want you to find one person to convince to vote for our ticket. >> both candidates are well aware in the last election in the last 44 years ohio has voted for the winning candidate so the politicians woo voters. >> we can create one million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years with the right policies. that's what i'm fighting for
to an incredible hour of television on "squawk box" with zell talking about what he's seen in the economy, talking more about corporate i.t. upgrade cycles. here's what zell said not too long ago. >> nobody wants to make commitment to be on tomorrow. we run a company that does a lot of corporate enterprising installations. and one of their triggers is when the enterprise projects start getting delayed, we are heading for a recession. and that's exactly what you're looking at right now. >> when the enterprise project starts getting delayed, we are heading for a recession. that collides with the calls we are seeing regarding cisco right now. jim, channel checks going on? >> cisco, morgan stanley put out positive comments, but when you think about icht t. spending, it is oracle and cisco. the one thing confusing for me is ibm, sap, they both said business is quite strong. accenture just said these are strong. imperricly he's wrong. anecdotely he's right, imperricly he's wrong. >> not just highs but record highs in yesterday's recession. we are seeing the providers do well in today's stock market. >>
and its impact on the global economy. >>> now the giants' decision to make about melky cabrera. will he be on the roster for the playoffs? only at denny's. open all night. available in america right now. almost half our nation's employers have open positions they can't find anyone qualified to fill. devry university offers bachelor's and master's degrees that can prepare you for these careers. the ones already here, and the ones just around the corner. get the know how you need for a new tomorrow. learn more at devry.edu. >>> solid fog bank. inland, warm for some. but temperatures are a little bit below average. >>> 7:15. republican presidential candidate, mitt romney claims president obama has not come clean with details about that deadly u.s. embassy attack in libya. >> i think they want to do their very best from keeping the people in america from understanding exactly what happened. >> now, paul ryan also questioned whether the white house officials are on the same page. the administration has called the libya violence a terrorist attack but yesterday president obama used different
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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